How to Convert Callback-Based APIs to Flows or suspend functions in Kotlin

How to Convert Callback-Based APIs to Flows or suspend functions in Kotlin

How to Convert Callback-Based APIs to Flows or suspend functions in Kotlin

Learn how to convert callback-based apis to a more Kotlin friendly api

How to Convert Callback-Based APIs to Flows or suspend functions in Kotlin
How to Convert Callback-Based APIs to Flows or suspend functions in Kotlin

Learn how to convert callback-based apis to a more Kotlin friendly api

Learn how to convert callback-based apis to a more Kotlin friendly api

Learn how to convert callback-based apis to a more Kotlin friendly api

When working with multiple libraries, you may find yourself dealing with APIs that use callbacks. Converting these to use Kotlin Flows can help simplify your code.

Converting to Suspend Functions

To illustrate this, let’s look at the following function that uses callbacks :

fun getCustomerInfo(
    onError: (PurchasesError) -> Unit,
    onCustomerInfo: (CustomerInfo) -> Unit
) {
    Purchases.sharedInstance.getCustomerInfoWith(
        onError = { onError(it) },
        onSuccess = { onCustomerInfo(it) }
    )
}


We can simplify this by introducing suspend coroutines, but we still have callbacks:

fun getCustomerInfo(
    onError: (PurchasesError) -> Unit,
    onCustomerInfo: (CustomerInfo) -> Unit
) {
    Purchases.sharedInstance.getCustomerInfoWith(
        onError,
        onCustomerInfo
    )
}


However, we can now remove the callbacks entirely and use suspendCoroutine instead:

suspend fun getCustomerInfo(onError: (PurchasesError) -> Unit): CustomerInfo {
    return suspendCoroutine { continuation ->
        Purchases.sharedInstance.getCustomerInfoWith(
            onError = onError,
            onSuccess = { customerInfo ->
                continuation.resume(customerInfo)
            }
        )
    }
}


This allows us to make our function suspend, so that the caller waits until continuation.resume is called.

Best Practice

To further improve your code, it’s best to use the following version of the function:

suspend fun getCustomerInfo(): CustomerInfo {
    return suspendCoroutine { continuation ->
        Purchases.sharedInstance.getCustomerInfoWith(
            onError = { error ->
                throw PurchaseError()
            },
            onSuccess = { customerInfo ->
                continuation.resume(customerInfo)
            }
        )
    }
}

With the updated suspend function, the caller can now use the simplified code below to get the customer information:

val customerInfo = try {
    getCustomerInfo()
} catch (e: PurchasesError) {
    // handle error
}

Converting to Flows

Learn how to convert callback-based APIs to Kotlin Flows when working with multiple libraries. Callback-based APIs can be challenging to work with, and it’s essential to know how to optimize them for Kotlin. Here’s an example of a callback-based API that is not Kotlin-friendly:

fun getUserEvents(
    onSuccess: (UserEvents) -> Unit,
    onError: (Error) -> Unit
) {
    FirebaseFirestore.getInstance()
        .collection("collection")
        .document("app")
        .addSnapshotListener { snapshot, e ->
            if (e != null) {
                onError(e)
            }
            if (snapshot == null) {
                return@addSnapshotListener
            }
            onSuccess(snapshot.getEvents())
        }
}

Here’s how to change it to support flow response:

fun getUserEvents(): Flow<UserEvents> = callbackFlow {
    // Reference to use in Firestore
    var eventsCollection: CollectionReference? = null
    
    try {
        eventsCollection = FirebaseFirestore.getInstance()
            .collection("collection")
            .document("app")
    } catch (e: Throwable) {
        // If Firebase cannot be initialized, close the stream of data
        // flow consumers will stop collecting and the coroutine will resume
        close(e)
    }
    
    // Registers callback to firestore, which will be called on new events
    val subscription = eventsCollection?.addSnapshotListener { snapshot, _ ->
        if (snapshot == null) {
            return@addSnapshotListener
        }
        // Sends events to the flow! Consumers will get the new events
        try {
            offer(snapshot.getEvents())
        } catch (e: Throwable) {
            // Event couldn't be sent to the flow
        }
    }
    
    // The callback inside awaitClose will be executed when the flow is
    // either closed or cancelled.
    // In this case, remove the callback from Firestore
    awaitClose {
        subscription?.remove()
    }
}

Converting callback-based APIs to Kotlin Flows can make them easier to work with and optimize for Kotlin. Follow the above code snippets to learn how to convert them efficiently.

If you want to learn more about Kotlin Multiplatform and Compose Multiplatform find our best work here.

When working with multiple libraries, you may find yourself dealing with APIs that use callbacks. Converting these to use Kotlin Flows can help simplify your code.

Converting to Suspend Functions

To illustrate this, let’s look at the following function that uses callbacks :

fun getCustomerInfo(
    onError: (PurchasesError) -> Unit,
    onCustomerInfo: (CustomerInfo) -> Unit
) {
    Purchases.sharedInstance.getCustomerInfoWith(
        onError = { onError(it) },
        onSuccess = { onCustomerInfo(it) }
    )
}


We can simplify this by introducing suspend coroutines, but we still have callbacks:

fun getCustomerInfo(
    onError: (PurchasesError) -> Unit,
    onCustomerInfo: (CustomerInfo) -> Unit
) {
    Purchases.sharedInstance.getCustomerInfoWith(
        onError,
        onCustomerInfo
    )
}


However, we can now remove the callbacks entirely and use suspendCoroutine instead:

suspend fun getCustomerInfo(onError: (PurchasesError) -> Unit): CustomerInfo {
    return suspendCoroutine { continuation ->
        Purchases.sharedInstance.getCustomerInfoWith(
            onError = onError,
            onSuccess = { customerInfo ->
                continuation.resume(customerInfo)
            }
        )
    }
}


This allows us to make our function suspend, so that the caller waits until continuation.resume is called.

Best Practice

To further improve your code, it’s best to use the following version of the function:

suspend fun getCustomerInfo(): CustomerInfo {
    return suspendCoroutine { continuation ->
        Purchases.sharedInstance.getCustomerInfoWith(
            onError = { error ->
                throw PurchaseError()
            },
            onSuccess = { customerInfo ->
                continuation.resume(customerInfo)
            }
        )
    }
}

With the updated suspend function, the caller can now use the simplified code below to get the customer information:

val customerInfo = try {
    getCustomerInfo()
} catch (e: PurchasesError) {
    // handle error
}

Converting to Flows

Learn how to convert callback-based APIs to Kotlin Flows when working with multiple libraries. Callback-based APIs can be challenging to work with, and it’s essential to know how to optimize them for Kotlin. Here’s an example of a callback-based API that is not Kotlin-friendly:

fun getUserEvents(
    onSuccess: (UserEvents) -> Unit,
    onError: (Error) -> Unit
) {
    FirebaseFirestore.getInstance()
        .collection("collection")
        .document("app")
        .addSnapshotListener { snapshot, e ->
            if (e != null) {
                onError(e)
            }
            if (snapshot == null) {
                return@addSnapshotListener
            }
            onSuccess(snapshot.getEvents())
        }
}

Here’s how to change it to support flow response:

fun getUserEvents(): Flow<UserEvents> = callbackFlow {
    // Reference to use in Firestore
    var eventsCollection: CollectionReference? = null
    
    try {
        eventsCollection = FirebaseFirestore.getInstance()
            .collection("collection")
            .document("app")
    } catch (e: Throwable) {
        // If Firebase cannot be initialized, close the stream of data
        // flow consumers will stop collecting and the coroutine will resume
        close(e)
    }
    
    // Registers callback to firestore, which will be called on new events
    val subscription = eventsCollection?.addSnapshotListener { snapshot, _ ->
        if (snapshot == null) {
            return@addSnapshotListener
        }
        // Sends events to the flow! Consumers will get the new events
        try {
            offer(snapshot.getEvents())
        } catch (e: Throwable) {
            // Event couldn't be sent to the flow
        }
    }
    
    // The callback inside awaitClose will be executed when the flow is
    // either closed or cancelled.
    // In this case, remove the callback from Firestore
    awaitClose {
        subscription?.remove()
    }
}

Converting callback-based APIs to Kotlin Flows can make them easier to work with and optimize for Kotlin. Follow the above code snippets to learn how to convert them efficiently.

If you want to learn more about Kotlin Multiplatform and Compose Multiplatform find our best work here.

When working with multiple libraries, you may find yourself dealing with APIs that use callbacks. Converting these to use Kotlin Flows can help simplify your code.

Converting to Suspend Functions

To illustrate this, let’s look at the following function that uses callbacks :

fun getCustomerInfo(
    onError: (PurchasesError) -> Unit,
    onCustomerInfo: (CustomerInfo) -> Unit
) {
    Purchases.sharedInstance.getCustomerInfoWith(
        onError = { onError(it) },
        onSuccess = { onCustomerInfo(it) }
    )
}


We can simplify this by introducing suspend coroutines, but we still have callbacks:

fun getCustomerInfo(
    onError: (PurchasesError) -> Unit,
    onCustomerInfo: (CustomerInfo) -> Unit
) {
    Purchases.sharedInstance.getCustomerInfoWith(
        onError,
        onCustomerInfo
    )
}


However, we can now remove the callbacks entirely and use suspendCoroutine instead:

suspend fun getCustomerInfo(onError: (PurchasesError) -> Unit): CustomerInfo {
    return suspendCoroutine { continuation ->
        Purchases.sharedInstance.getCustomerInfoWith(
            onError = onError,
            onSuccess = { customerInfo ->
                continuation.resume(customerInfo)
            }
        )
    }
}


This allows us to make our function suspend, so that the caller waits until continuation.resume is called.

Best Practice

To further improve your code, it’s best to use the following version of the function:

suspend fun getCustomerInfo(): CustomerInfo {
    return suspendCoroutine { continuation ->
        Purchases.sharedInstance.getCustomerInfoWith(
            onError = { error ->
                throw PurchaseError()
            },
            onSuccess = { customerInfo ->
                continuation.resume(customerInfo)
            }
        )
    }
}

With the updated suspend function, the caller can now use the simplified code below to get the customer information:

val customerInfo = try {
    getCustomerInfo()
} catch (e: PurchasesError) {
    // handle error
}

Converting to Flows

Learn how to convert callback-based APIs to Kotlin Flows when working with multiple libraries. Callback-based APIs can be challenging to work with, and it’s essential to know how to optimize them for Kotlin. Here’s an example of a callback-based API that is not Kotlin-friendly:

fun getUserEvents(
    onSuccess: (UserEvents) -> Unit,
    onError: (Error) -> Unit
) {
    FirebaseFirestore.getInstance()
        .collection("collection")
        .document("app")
        .addSnapshotListener { snapshot, e ->
            if (e != null) {
                onError(e)
            }
            if (snapshot == null) {
                return@addSnapshotListener
            }
            onSuccess(snapshot.getEvents())
        }
}

Here’s how to change it to support flow response:

fun getUserEvents(): Flow<UserEvents> = callbackFlow {
    // Reference to use in Firestore
    var eventsCollection: CollectionReference? = null
    
    try {
        eventsCollection = FirebaseFirestore.getInstance()
            .collection("collection")
            .document("app")
    } catch (e: Throwable) {
        // If Firebase cannot be initialized, close the stream of data
        // flow consumers will stop collecting and the coroutine will resume
        close(e)
    }
    
    // Registers callback to firestore, which will be called on new events
    val subscription = eventsCollection?.addSnapshotListener { snapshot, _ ->
        if (snapshot == null) {
            return@addSnapshotListener
        }
        // Sends events to the flow! Consumers will get the new events
        try {
            offer(snapshot.getEvents())
        } catch (e: Throwable) {
            // Event couldn't be sent to the flow
        }
    }
    
    // The callback inside awaitClose will be executed when the flow is
    // either closed or cancelled.
    // In this case, remove the callback from Firestore
    awaitClose {
        subscription?.remove()
    }
}

Converting callback-based APIs to Kotlin Flows can make them easier to work with and optimize for Kotlin. Follow the above code snippets to learn how to convert them efficiently.

If you want to learn more about Kotlin Multiplatform and Compose Multiplatform find our best work here.

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